Category: Sirennet Blog

E-ONE’s Typhoon Cab

Updates and refinements suggested by you

From FirefighterNation

E-ONE Fire Trucks – E-ONE’s new Typhoon Cab features updates and refinements suggested by you: Greater visibility with the new windshield design and reduced profile dash, slim profile air conditioning, and optional raised overhead console.

Wind whips embers from a tree as the Kincade Fire burns in unincorporated Sonoma County, Calif., on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

The new Typhoon offers full size/full opening door windows and exterior vertical pull door handles.

Learn more in this video.

Product Post: Whelen TIR3 Super-LED Lighthead

The TIR3 Series Super LED light module offers small size but super bright light output. This compact lighthead is perfect for mounting in the grill, on side mirrors, on bumpers, or numerous other applications. The TIR3 uses Generation III LED’s and over-sized reflectors with spreader optic lenses to fill the entire lighthead.

The TIR3 has a Scan-Lock flash pattern wire to change between 10 different built in flash patterns. This four wire TIR3 allows for synchronization for simultaneous or alternating patterns. All TIR3’s come with clear outer lenses and colored LED’s.

Features:

  • 3 Generation III LEDs with spreader optic lenses.
  • Standard Mode: 10 Scan-Lock Flash Patterns plus Steady Burn.
  • Synchronized Mode: 7 Scan-Lock Flash Patterns each with Phase 1 and Phase 2.
  • Four Wire Synchronization Version.
  • Fully encapsulated for vibration, moisture and corrosion resistance.
  • Black Surface Mount Flange Included Standard.
  • Designed for Horizontal Mounting.
  • Voltage: 12 VDC.
  • Amp draw: 390mA @ 13.6 VDC
  • Dimensions: 3-5/8″ W x 1-5/16″ H x 1-5/16″ D.

Whelen Five Year Warranty

NOTE: This lighthead cannot be used as a Brake/Tail/Turn lighthead.

Nation’s first statewide system debuted Thursday

By JOHN ANTCZAK Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Earthquake early warning alerts will become publicly available throughout California for the first time this week, potentially giving people time to protect themselves from harm, the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services said Wednesday.

FILE – In this Jan. 3, 2019 file photo a mobile phone customer looks at an earthquake warning application on their phone in Los Angeles. Earthquake early warning alerts will become publicly available throughout California for the first time this week, potentially giving people time to protect themselves from harm, the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services said Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019. Warnings produced by the ShakeAlert system will be pushed through two delivery systems: a cellphone app called MyShake and the same wireless notification system that issues Amber Alerts, meaning people may receive both notifications. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)

The nation’s first statewide quake warning system will debut Thursday, coinciding with the 30th anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquake that ravaged the San Francisco Bay area on Oct. 17, 1989, as well as the annual Great Shakeout safety drill.

Warnings produced by the ShakeAlert system will be pushed through two delivery systems: a cellphone app called MyShake and the same wireless notification system that issues Amber Alerts, meaning people may receive both notifications.

“This app is at a place now where we’re satisfied with the performance and the testing, which has been very well done, (so) that we think we’re at a place where it’s not perfect but we can keep people safe, and that’s our ultimate threshold,” said Brian Ferguson, deputy director for crisis communication and public affairs at the Office of Emergency Services.

The state earthquake app, developed at the University of California, Berkeley, is available for download to IOS users through iTunes and through GooglePlay stores for Android phones.

“The alerts will only go to people that are going to feel shaking,” said Richard Allen, director of the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory.

The thresholds for an alert are an earthquake of magnitude 4.5 and shaking intensity level 3.

“Intensity 1 is you don’t feel it; intensity 2 is some people may feel it; intensity 3 is many people do feel it,” Allen said.

The ShakeAlert system is being developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and partners for the West Coast states. It is most complete in California.

The system does not predict earthquakes. Rather, it uses numerous seismic stations to detect the start of an earthquake and light-speed communications to send the data to computers that instantly calculate location, magnitude, intensity of shaking and create alerts to be distributed to areas that will be affected.

Depending on distance from the epicenter, the alerts may give warnings of several seconds to a minute before shaking arrives at a given location — enough time to duck under desks, pull a knife away from a surgical patient or shut down elevators, trains and industrial processes.

After lengthy testing, alerts were made broadly available to businesses, utilities, schools and other entities last year. The only large-scale public notification is in Los Angeles County, where an alerting app developed for the city of Los Angeles hasn’t been triggered yet.

The MyShake system maintains a database of which cellphones are in 10-kilometer-by-10-kilometer (6.2-mile-by-6.2-mile) cell grids and pushes the alerts to phones in zones where at least level 3 shaking will occur, so receiving an alert is not based on which tower the phone is communicating with, Allen said.

The Wireless Emergency Alerts system, known as WEA, operates slightly differently.

WEA creates polygons that include cellphone towers, said Ryan Arba chief of the seismic hazards branch of the Office of Emergency Services.

“If your phone is currently communicating with that cell tower, the message will be broadcast to your phone,” he said.

A person will get an alert if they are outside a polygon but their phone is communicating with a tower inside the polygon, he said.

Arba said none of the alerting systems are perfect, and it may also be possible that people feel quakes without receiving alerts.

“When live alerts go out, we’ll know how the system performs from the alert distribution side, which is something we have no visibility into now,” he said.

The developers expect to improve the system through experience.

Most recently, the MyShake system was tested this week by a magnitude 4.5 quake in the San Francisco Bay Area and a 4.7 in central California. The median times from detection to alerts hitting phones was 2.1 seconds and 1.6 seconds, respectively, Allen said.

“An important caveat here is this is measuring delivery of alerts to a relatively small number of phones, not to the millions of phones that we will want to do in a big earthquake with many more people having the app. But this is encouraging,” Allen said.

The Los Angeles app was criticized because it did not alert users when two powerful earthquakes struck an area of the Mojave Desert more than 100 miles north of the city on July 4 and 5.

Experts said the goal was to alert people who might experience potentially damaging shaking rather than simply feel some shaking. But the city later announced the threshold will be lowered to alert of “weak” shaking.

All contents © copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Product Post: Code 3 CB7265 Series Mini Beacon

Code 3’s CB765 Series LED Beacon produces a warning signal that is ideal for industrial applications. The long, maintenance-free service life of LED technology, backed by a 5-year warranty, makes this a perfect replacement solution for existing strobe beacons. This cost-effective light features 12-24V operating range that also makes it ideal for use on electrically powered vehicles and equipment.

For more information, head over to our @SirennetTV Instagram page and see this light in action.

Pierce Manufacturing Introduces New Ultra Highrise Pumper at China Fire 2019

Pierce Manufacturing announced the introduction of the new Ultra Highrise Pumper at China Fire 2019 in Beijing on October 16. The pumper includes momentous features including the ability to pump fire suppression agents up to 420 meters (1,378 feet) in height, and its first highrise test was UL certified. 

APPLETON, Wis. (October 16, 2019) – Pierce Manufacturing Inc., an Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE:OSK) company, announced that it has introduced the new Pierce® Ultra Highrise Pumper (UHRP) at China Fire 2019 (Booth E2-9), in Beijing on October 16. China’s continued urbanization and economic growth, including the development of buildings reaching extraordinary heights, have led to a critical need for advanced fire protection throughout many provinces. With its first highrise test UL certified, Pierce’s new UHRP includes momentous features including the ability to pump fire suppression agents up to 420 meters (1,378 feet) in height.

In 2019, 60-percent of the world’s “super-tall” buildings currently under construction will be completed in China. Now with over 110 buildings exceeding 350 meters (1,148 feet) in height, China boasts a significant number of the world’s tallest buildings dispersed throughout various geographic areas including Chongqing, Guangzhou, Nanjing, Shenzhen, and more.

“Pierce continues to build momentum on a global scale while being recognized as a company that produces high-quality fire apparatus with superior features and performance,” said Jim Johnson, president of Pierce Manufacturing. “The introduction of the new Pierce Ultra Highrise Pumper is one example of our team’s commitment to developing the most innovative apparatus to support the lifesaving work of dedicated men and women in the fire service across the world.”

The UHRP is manufactured at Pierce’s production facilities in the United States and built on Pierce’s custom Arrow XT™  chassis with Cummins ISX engine (550 horsepower) and Three-stage Waterous CMU/CGV fire pump (1500 GPM). Pierce’s in-country customer support team remains ready in China to provide world-class after-sales service and parts support across the country.

On September 28, 2019, the Oshkosh China team and Guangxi Fire Rescue Corps jointly completed a successful UHRP test at the 403-meter-tall China Resources Building in Nanning, China.

“Fire fighting in highrise buildings is a worldwide challenge,” said Kebin Liao, deputy chief of staff at the headquarters of the Guangxi Fire Rescue Corps. “This pumper is deployed to provide water for fighting fire at ultra highrise buildings in the event the built-in fire fighting system fails.” The water reached 384 meters (1,259 feet), the 85th floor through a line of high-pressure hoses with total length of 1.2 km (3,950 feet). This test was UL certified and the pumper could have sent the water to a higher floor if the construction was complete.

For more information about Pierce Manufacturing and the company’s booth offerings at China Fire 2019, visit www.piercemfg.com.


Typhoon Kills Dozens in Japan; Rescuers Search for Missing

At least 48 dead, 17 missing and around 100 injured

By JAE C. HONG and YURI KAGEYAMA Associated Press

NAGANO, Japan (AP) — Rescue crews dug through mudslides and searched near swollen rivers Monday as they looked for those missing from a typhoon that left dozens dead and caused serious damage in central and northern Japan.

Typhoon Hagibis unleashed torrents of rain and strong winds Saturday, leaving thousands of homes on Japan’s main island flooded, damaged or without power.

A riverside section of Nagano, northwest of Tokyo, was covered with mud, its apple orchards completely flooded and homes still without electricity.

Japan’s Kyodo News agency reported that 48 people died from the typhoon, 17 were missing and some 100 were injured.

The government’s Fire and Disaster Management Agency, which is generally more conservative in assessing its numbers, said 24 people were dead and nine were missing.

Two search and rescue team members walk along the mud-covered street Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, in Hoyasu, Japan. Rescue crews in Japan dug through mudslides and searched near swollen rivers Monday as they looked for those missing from a typhoon that left as many as 36 dead and caused serious damage in central and northern Japan. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Experts said it would take time to accurately assess the extent of damage, and the casualty count has been growing daily.

Hagibis dropped record amounts of rain for a period in some spots, according to meteorological officials, causing more than 20 rivers to overflow. In Kanagawa prefecture, southwest of Tokyo, 100 centimeters (39 inches) of rain was recorded over 48 hours.

Some of the muddy waters in streets, fields and residential areas have subsided. But many places remained flooded Monday, with homes and surrounding roads covered in mud and littered with broken wooden pieces and debris. Some places normally dry still looked like giant rivers.

Typhoon-damaged cars sit on the street covered with mud Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, in Hoyasu, Japan. Rescue crews in Japan dug through mudslides and searched near swollen rivers Monday as they looked for those missing from typhoon Hagibis that left as many as 36 dead and caused serious damage in central and northern Japan. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Typhoon-damaged cars sit on the street covered with mud Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, in Hoyasu, Japan. Rescue crews in Japan dug through mudslides and searched near swollen rivers Monday as they looked for those missing from typhoon Hagibis that left as many as 36 dead and caused serious damage in central and northern Japan. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Some who lined up for morning soup at evacuation shelters, which are housing 30,000 people, expressed concern about the homes they left behind. Survivors and rescuers will also face colder weather, with northern Japan turning chilly this week.

Soldiers and firefighters from throughout Japan were deployed to assist with rescue efforts. Helicopters could be seen plucking some of the stranded from higher floors and rooftops of submerged homes.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the government would set up a special disaster team, including officials from various ministries, to deal with the fallout from the typhoon, including helping those in evacuation centers and boosting efforts to restore water and electricity to homes.

“Our response must be rapid and appropriate,” Abe said, stressing that many people remained missing and damage was extensive.

Damage was especially serious in Nagano prefecture, where an embankment of the Chikuma River broke.

In one area, a few vehicles in used car lots were flipped over by the waters that had gushed in, covering everything with mud. Apples swept from the flooded orchards lay scattered in the mud.

Search and rescue team members wade through floodwaters Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, in Hoyasu, Japan. Rescue crews in Japan dug through mudslides and searched near swollen rivers Monday as they looked for those missing from a typhoon that left as many as 36 dead and caused serious damage in central and northern Japan. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Areas in Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures in northern Japan were also badly flooded.

In such places, rescue crew paddled in boats to reach half-submerged homes, calling out to anyone left stranded.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said 35,100 homes were still without electricity early Monday evening in Tokyo and nearby prefectures that the utility serves. That was down from nearly 57,000 earlier in the day.

East Japan Railway Co. said Hokuriku bullet trains were running Monday but were reduced in frequency and limited to the Nagano city and Tokyo routes.

Mimori Domoto, who works at Nagano craft beer-maker Yoho Brewing Co., said all 40 employees at her company were confirmed safe, though deliveries were halted.

“My heart aches when I think of the damage that happened in Nagano. Who would have thought it would get this bad?” she said.

Tama River in Tokyo overflowed, but the damage was not as great in the capital as in other areas. Areas surrounding Tokyo, such as Tochigi, also suffered damage.

Much of life in Tokyo returned to normal on Monday. People were out and about in the city, trains were running, and store shelves left bare when people were stockpiling were replenished.


Kageyama reported from Tokyo.

Follow Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyama

On Instagram https://www.instagram.com/yurikageyama/?hl=en

All contents © copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Product Post: Feniex Fusion 600 Dual Color LED Light Stick

The Feniex Fusion 600 Dual Color LED Light Stick is a great 6 module Warning Bar or Traffic Advisor that can help protect your vehicle from rear end collisions. At under an inch in height, this slim and stealthy light stick series, provides intense lighting over long distances. 

The Fusion 600 Dual Color LED Light Stick features Dual color modules have Twelve Cree 4 watt LEDs (6 of each color), and your choice of 40° or 180° light spread optics for each module. There are 57 warning and directional patterns make sure that you have the best possible pattern to warn oncoming traffic.

Features:

  • 12 high power 4 Watt Cree LEDs per module.
  • Dual Colors: Amber-White, Blue-White, Red-White, Blue-Amber, Red-Amber, Red-Blue.
  • 57 flash patterns.
  • Available in 40° or 180° light spread optics per module.
  • Rugged weather-resistant enclosure.
  • Encased in Rugged, aluminum extrusion.

Capabilities:

  • 2 programmable modes
  • Directional Patterns
  • Takedown or Work-Light
  • Flood Mode

Four bracket options:

  • Rotating
  • Headliner
  • Single L-Bracket
  • Double L-Bracket

Tech Specs:

  • Input voltage 12 VDC
  • Current Draw: 4 Amps
  • Cable Harness length: 10 Feet
  • Certifications SAE J595, California Title 13, SAE J1119
  • Dimensions: 0.95″ H x 28″ L x1.5″ W
  • Made in the USA

Feniex 5 Year Warranty

100,000 Ordered to Evacuate from California Wildfire

“It was a whole curtain of fire,”

By STEFANIE DAZIO and JOHN ANTCZAK Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A wildfire raged out of control along the northern edge of Los Angeles early Friday, forcing thousands of people from their homes as firefighters battled flames from the air and on the ground.

Police Chief Michel Moore said mandatory evacuations encompassed about 100,000 people in over 20,000 homes.

Fire Chief Ralph Terrazas said the fire had grown to more than 7 square miles (18 square kilometers) and at least 25 homes had been damaged. A middle-aged man who was near where the fire was burning went into cardiac arrest and died, the chief said, but he did not have details.

The blaze erupted around 9 p.m. Thursday along the northern tier of the San Fernando Valley as powerful Santa Ana winds swept through Southern California. Smoke streamed across the city and out to sea.

Terrazas said there were sustained winds of 20-25 mph (32-40 kph) with gusts over 50 mph (80 kph) and relative humidity levels had fallen as low as 3%.

“As you can imagine the embers from the wind have been traveling a significant distance which causes another fire to start,” Terrazas said.

Jerry Rowe uses a garden hose to save his home on Beaufait Avenue from the Saddleridge fire in Granada Hills, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Owen Baker)

The fire erupted in Sylmar, the northernmost portion of the valley, and spread westward at a rate of 800 acres (324 hectares) an hour into Granada Hills and Porter Ranch, part of a so-called urban-wildland interface where subdivisions crowd against the foothills of the Santa Susana Mountains. The cause wasn’t immediately known.

Porter Ranch, an upper middle-class suburb that was the backdrop for the 1982 movie “E.T.” is no stranger to evacuations. Four years ago, a blowout at an underground natural gas well operated by Southern California Gas Co. in the neighboring Aliso Canyon storage facility drove 8,000 families from their homes.

In Northern California , the lights were back on Friday for more than half of the 2 million residents who lost electricity after the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. utility switched it off on Wednesday to prevent its equipment from sparking wildfires during dry, windy weather.

PG&E restored the power after workers inspected power lines to make sure it was safe to do so. The winds had increased the possibility of transmission lines toppling to the ground and starting wildfires.

Helicopters made repeated water drops as crews in Los Angeles attacked flames in and around homes. Water- and retardant-dropping airplanes joined the battle after daybreak. About 1,000 firefighters were on the lines.

Edwin Bernard, 73, said he and his wife were forced to leave their four cats behind as they fled their Sylmar home.

Bernard, standing outside the evacuation center at the Sylmar Recreation Center on Friday, said they were only able to grab their three dogs. During a previous wildfire, they’d had time to find their passports and photo albums, but not Thursday night.

“The fireman said, ‘go, go, go!’” Bernard said. “It was a whole curtain of fire,” he said. “There was fire on all sides. We had to leave.”

Evacuations were also still in effect in the inland region east of Los Angeles where a fire erupted Thursday and raged through a mobile home park in the Calimesa area of Riverside County.

Seventy-four buildings were destroyed, others were damaged and Riverside County authorities were trying to determine if anyone was missing.

One person who couldn’t be immediately located was Don Turner’s 89-year-old mother.

Lois Arvickson called her son from her cellphone to say she was evacuating shortly after the blaze was reported in the small city of Calimesa, Turner said while with relatives at an evacuation center.

“She said she’s getting her purse and she’s getting out, and the line went dead,” he said.

Arvickson’s neighbors saw her in her garage as flames approached, according to Turner. A short time later the neighbors saw the garage on fire, but they don’t know if she’d managed to escape, he said.

Melissa Brown said she moved to the mobile home complex earlier this year from Arizona, in part to help take care of her mother who has since died. Brown said she now also faces the loss of her home.

“The hardest part is my mom’s remains are in there,” she said Friday morning, choking back tears.

Fire danger is high throughout Southern California after the typically dry summer and early fall, and the notorious Santa Ana winds — linked to the spread of many wildfires — bring a dangerous mix of witheringly low humidity levels and powerful gusts.

The Calimesa fire erupted when the driver of a commercial trash truck dumped a smoldering load to prevent the vehicle from catching fire.

Dry grass quickly ignited and winds gusting to 50 mph (80 kph) blew the fire into the Villa Calimesa Mobile Home Park about 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of downtown Los Angeles. The park has 110 home sites and was built in 1958, according to its website. Fire officials were investigating what caused the trash in the truck to catch fire in Calimesa.

__

Dazio reported from Los Angeles and Calimesa. Christopher Weber and writer John Antczak reported from Los Angeles.

All contents © copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Product Post: Whelen Avenger II DUO Combination Linear/TIR Single LED Dash/Deck Light

The Whelen Avenger II DUO Combination Linear/TIR Single LED Dash/Deck Light with their compact and inconspicuous design are simple to transfer from vehicle to vehicle. Newly designed combination Linear/TIR optics provide high intensity warning and illumination and a smaller profile maximizes space for optimal versatility. The Avenger II builds on the Avenger’s reputation for excellent functionality and efficiency.

Features

  • 12 Super-LEDs total: 6 TIR and 6 Linear.
  • DUO color combinations include:
  • Multiple flash patterns (See PDF flyer).
  • SAE Class 1 Certified.
  • Hardcoated lenses minimize UV damage and resist scratches.
  • Universal swivel bracket with three suction cups will fit the contour of any windshield or can be used for permanent mount.
  • Black polycarbonate housing.
  • Includes 10 foot straight cord with cigar plug featuring two switches: On/Off for Color 1, On/Off for Color 2.

DUO model features two recessed buttons in the housing: 

  • 1 ScanLock button for flash pattern selection.
  • 1 Mode button for color combination selection.

Specifications

  • Voltage: 12 VDC
  • Certifications: Class 1, SAE J595, California Title 13 (Red Only).
  • Single unit: 1-3/4” (44mm) H x 4-1/2” (114mm) D x 6-1/2” (165mm) L.
  • Height with adjustable mounting bracket for all models: 1-3/5” (41mm) to 2-9/10” (74mm).

Whelen Five Year Warranty

Pierce Secures Order for 11 Custom Fire Apparatus for the Indianapolis (IN) Fire Department

From FireFighterNation

APPLETON, WI—Pierce Manufacturing Inc., has secured an order for 11 custom apparatus for the Indianapolis (IN) Fire Department in Indiana. Placed through Indianapolis-based Pierce dealer, Global Emergency Products, the order is made up of six Pierce® Saber® pumpers, two Enforcer™ Ascendant® 110’ heavy-duty Aerial Platforms, one Enforcer 105’ heavy-duty aerial ladder, one Velocity® heavy-duty walk-in rescue, and one Ford® F-550 tactical support unit.

“I am excited to be able to purchase our apparatus through Global Emergency Products and Pierce. They have always gone above and beyond to assist us in any way,” said Ernest V. Malone, Chief of Fire for the Indianapolis Fire Department. “While the quality of the equipment that the department receives continues to meet our high level of expectations, it is the relationship and trust we have built with Global and Pierce that makes the Indianapolis Fire Department want to continue to work with them as our apparatus manufacturer.”

Pierce Manufacturing has secured an order and begun production on 11 custom fire apparatus for the Indianapolis Fire Department including Pierce® Saber® Pumpers, Enforcer ™ Ascendant® 110’ Heavy-Duty Aerial Platforms, an Enforcer 105’ Heavy-Duty Aerial Ladder, a Velocity® Heavy-Duty Walk-In Rescue, and a Ford® F-550 Tactical Support Unit.

The Indianapolis Fire Department has 43 fire stations serving 278 square miles in the most populated area in Indiana. The apparatus order is part of a 10-year apparatus acquisition plan that will replace aging frontline equipment, while allowing the department to improve the quality of its reserve fleet.

“The City of Indianapolis allows its fire department representatives the opportunity to select fire apparatus and equipment specifications that will best meet their needs. Together, we designed vehicles that have proven to meet their particular needs,” said Mike Mikoola, President of Global Emergency Products. “It’s been a true honor to work alongside Chief Malone and his team. We remain committed to providing the Indianapolis Fire Department superior quality and customization options, as well as convenient access to service support and parts replacement.”

The delivery of the Indianapolis Fire Department’s six pumpers is scheduled for November 2019, and the aerials will follow in January 2020. The rescue and Ford unit are expected to arrive in Indianapolis in April 2020.

Malone continued, “What we ask our firefighters to do is very dangerous. The needs of our communities are multidimensional and continue to grow in complexity, hazard, and risk. Our firefighters must be up to this challenge every day, every shift, every time. Through fire suppression, emergency medical, special operations, and many other calls for service, the new apparatus will help us continue to meet that missionprotect our firefighters,and keep our promise to our community.”

For more information, visit www.piercemfg.com.