Category: Sirennet Blog

Ore. police chief named as new Philadelphia police commissioner

By Chris Palmer, David Gambacorta and Anna Orso of the Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — Mayor Jim Kenney on Monday named Danielle Outlaw, the chief of police in Portland, Ore., as Philadelphia’s new police commissioner, marking a new chapter for a 6,500-member force plagued by scandal.

The appointment is a landmark decision for Kenney, who is just days away from beginning his second term, and it comes as the department continues to grapple with fallout from allegations made in lawsuits and news accounts that the department’s culture is marred by rampant sexual harassment, discrimination and racism.

Mayor Jim Kenney on Monday named Danielle Outlaw, the chief of police in Portland, Ore., as Philadelphia's new police commissioner, marking a new chapter for a 6,500-member force plagued by scandal. (Photo/John Rudoff/Sipa-USA/TNS)
Mayor Jim Kenney on Monday named Danielle Outlaw, the chief of police in Portland, Ore., as Philadelphia’s new police commissioner, marking a new chapter for a 6,500-member force plagued by scandal. (Photo/John Rudoff/Sipa-USA/TNS)

Outlaw, 43, will be the first black woman to lead the city’s police force, and the second woman to take over as commissioner. She has led Portland’s 877-member force since 2018 after a 20-year career as an officer in her hometown of Oakland, Calif.

Her short tenure in Portland — one of the nation’s most liberal and whitest cities — did not pass without controversy, as some critics questioned her department’s handling of rallies and counterprotests, as well as a decision last summer to clear a protest camp that surrounded an Immigration and Customs Enforcement office.

Still, in an emailed statement, Kenney said Outlaw was the right person to take on Philadelphia’s host of challenges — including persistent gun violence that continued to rise in 2019.

“I am convinced she has the conviction, courage and compassion needed to bring long-overdue reform to the Department,” Kenney said in the email. “After meeting and speaking with her at length, I came away confident that Danielle Outlaw possesses the strength, integrity and empathy vital to the tasks ahead.”

Outlaw, in the same statement, said that although she was new to Philadelphia, “I am not new to the challenges of big-city, 21st-century policing.”

“I will work relentlessly to reduce crime in Philadelphia — particularly the insidious gun violence that plagues too many communities,” Outlaw said. “And I will do so in a way that ensures all people are treated equitably regardless of their gender identity, race, ethnicity or sexual orientation.”

Her appointment comes after a four-month search process largely cloaked in secrecy. Christine Coulter has been serving as acting commissioner since the abrupt resignation of former Commissioner Richard Ross in August, after a woman accused him in a lawsuit of retaliating against her for breaking off their affair — an allegation Ross has denied.

Stakeholders in the city’s criminal justice and political establishments reacted generally favorably to the news Monday.

“Most of us are very encouraged,” Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell said of colleagues in City Hall. “They’re especially happy that she’s a woman — and happy of course that it’s an African American woman — but especially happy that she’s a woman.”

Rochelle Bilal, president of the Guardian Civic League, a black police officers’ organization, said in a statement that the group was disappointed Kenney did not appoint a woman of color from within the department, but that “we are committed to embracing (Outlaw) and ensuring her success here in the city of Philadelphia.”

John McNesby, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, said in a statement that the police officers’ union also was hoping an internal candidate would win the job, but that “we look forward to a professional, working partnership with Chief Outlaw that includes making our city safer for our residents and our (6,500-plus) police officers.”

Former Philadelphia Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey called Outlaw’s selection “a good choice.”

“She’s very bright, very talented,” said Ramsey, who first met Outlaw several years ago when he was president of the Major Cities Chiefs Association. “(The Police Department) is in a position now where an outsider will be a breath of fresh air.”

Outlaw took over in Portland in 2017, and she faced several controversies during her time leading the force.

Her department was criticized last year for using flash-bang devices and some chemical irritants during a right-wing rally and anti-fascist counterprotest, and she also made a decision last summer to clear a protest camp that surrounded an Immigration and Customs Enforcement office.

This year, after a video showed right-wing activist Andy Ngo being punched by counterprotesters, Outlaw drew scorn from national figures including Donald Trump Jr. and Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who claimed that her officers allowed violence against right-wing activists for political reasons. Portland’s mayor denied that assertion.

The Oregonian reported Monday that Outlaw told Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler on Friday about her impending departure, and that the mayor rejected her request to continue in the post through Jan. 1.

Kenney said Outlaw would begin in Philadelphia on Feb. 10.

Daryl Turner, president of the Portland Police Association, the local police union, said in an interview that he learned Monday morning from the Portland mayor’s police policy liaison that Outlaw was to be introduced as Philadelphia’s new commissioner.

“You’re getting a damn good chief,” Turner said. “We hate to lose her.”

Outlaw will inherit challenges. The lawsuit that prompted Ross’ resignation also claimed that the Police Department had been overrun by a culture of sexual harassment and discrimination — allegations that seemed to gain steam when one of Ross’ former high-ranking commanders, chief inspector Carl Holmes, was subsequently arrested and charged with sexually assaulting three female officers.

Ross’ departure came less than a week after he had helped negotiate the end to a violent standoff with a gunman in Tioga, who allegedly shot and wounded six cops during a botched drug raid.

Earlier in the summer, more than 300 active-duty cops were accused of posting racist or offensive material on their personal Facebook accounts, a scandal that included other jurisdictions around the country and attracted national attention. It led to the benching of 72 Philly officers and the forced departures of 15 — the department’s largest disciplinary action in recent memory.

After Ross stepped down, Coulter was named interim commissioner, the first woman to lead the department. But she soon had to apologize for a controversy of her own — a photo from the 1990s that surfaced showing her wearing a shirt that appeared to refer to the infamous Los Angeles police beating of Rodney King.

The tumult has come amid a backdrop of ongoing gun violence: More people have been shot in the city in 2019 than in any year since 2010, and the annual homicide tally has matched last year’s decade-long high.

Kenney’s search process was largely conducted behind closed doors, with key players in the city’s criminal justice system saying as recently as last week that they had been largely out of the loop on whom the mayor was considering to fill the post.

Outlaw has a sociology degree from the University of San Francisco and a master of business administration degree from Pepperdine University. She joined the Oakland Police Department just out of college.McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Police program clears homeless infractions in exchange for shelter stays

By Gary Warth from The San Diego Union-Tribune

SAN DIEGO — Homeless people who face a ticket or arrest by San Diego police officers are being offered a chance to have the infraction cleared if they agree to stay for 30 days in one of the city’s large tented bridge shelters.

San Diego police Capt. Scott Wahl said the new program could help stabilize lives and get people connected with services, while also allowing officers to enforce laws on the street.

Homeless Outreach Team member Deputy Aaron Bert looks for a person who was living under a bridge and had asked for an appointment to talk with them about getting help. (John Gibbins/San Diego Union-Tribune/TNS)
Homeless Outreach Team member Deputy Aaron Bert looks for a person who was living under a bridge and had asked for an appointment to talk with them about getting help. (John Gibbins/San Diego Union-Tribune/TNS)

“I feel like we’ve started this division because we wanted to be a positive impact on ending homelessness,” Wahl said about the department’s neighborhood policing division that was formed last year. The division includes homeless outreach teams and officers who enforce quality-of-life laws that often involve homeless people.

“We’re all trying to do our part in ending homelessness, and we want to do it in a way that’s compassionate, but also has accountability,” he said.

The incentive is a revision to a similar effort that began in July. Police officers last summer began offering shelter beds in lieu of citations to homeless people who had been contacted for encroachment, illegal lodging, littering or other minor quality-of-life infractions.

Wahl said about 300 people took the offer, but there was a problem.

“We noticed that 67 percent of people blew out the back door on the very first day,” he said about people who took the offer to avoid citations but had no intention of staying sheltered. “They’re circumventing the criminal justice system intentionally.”

The revised approach still offers shelter beds in lieu of citations, but the tickets aren’t torn up quite so soon. If somebody leaves the shelter before 30 days, the citation will be enforced.

Wahl sees the incentive as having a two-fold benefit. While addressing quality-of-life infractions in neighborhoods, it also gives homeless people a month to learn about programs that could help them find housing and overcome issues related to their homelessness.

“They can still go outside,” Wahl said about the shelter. “It’s not jail. They’re still free to come and go, but they have to be in at night.”

Under the program, 50 of the 128 beds at the new shelter run by the Alpha Project are reserved for homeless people brought in by officers. The shelter opened at 17th Street and Imperial Avenue in November, and the police incentive program began shortly afterwards.

The shelter was the site of the Dec. 28 fatal shooting of Alpha Project security guard Ernest Buchanan. Police are still investigating the shooting and have released no new information.

Bob McElroy, president and CEO of the Alpha Project, said the 50 beds are filled most nights, and the incentive program has shown some success after working out a few early kinks. One homeless person has found housing after being brought in by officers in the program, he said.

The shelter incentive is an outgrowth of a program the Police Department’s Homeless Outreach Team, or HOT, has been conducting for several years. Officers who encounter someone who is homeless may offer the person one of 50 beds that have been reserved for the department at Father Joe’s Villages.

Only one in 10 homeless people police encounter on downtown streets accept the offer of a shelter bed in a non-enforcement encounter, Wahl said, a situation he admits is frustrating.

He and others say they have seen better retention for those who do accept the officer of a shelter bed under the revised program, but it’s still too early to judge whether it’s effective.

In the first few weeks, Wahl said 46 percent of people brought in under the new program walked away before the 30 days were up. He acknowledged that’s a better outcome than the 67 percent who left under the earlier program but wondered if the cold and wet weather might have motivated people to stay longer.

McElroy said he believes people have been staying longer in recent weeks, and he sees some potential  for the program.

“That month gives us an opportunity to find out who they are, and they can find out who we are,” he said.

McElroy had reservations in the beginning. He said some people who were brought in had kits to use heroin and methamphetamine because they had not been properly searched, and others showed up with many more bags of possessions than are allowed inside the shelter.

McElroy said better communication with law enforcement ironed out those problems. In another issue, he said people in the program originally were not offered the same services as others in the shelter, but rather limited services from the county. McElroy said he made it clear in meetings with county officials that people in the facility would have access all of its resources.

“If they come in, they have the same access to our case manager and housing navigators,” he said. “We made it clear… we’re not changing any of our programs.”

Some advocates for people experiencing homelessness have expressed a few concerns about the incentive program, noting that reserving shelter beds for people brought in by the HOT teams reduces the number available for others who want to get in. Homeless advocate Michael McConnell said people who walk away from the shelter before the 30 days are over could find that prosecutors use that information against them in court.

The new incentive program is one of a few changes that have been made to the Police Department’s outreach efforts since the neighborhood policing division was formed. Wahl said changes include expanding the homeless outreach teams with four county Health and Human Service Agency specialists and three Psychiatric Emergency Response Team members who patrol with officers daily.

Earlier this year, two case workers were added to specifically work with people who accept offers of a bed at Father Joe’s Villages, and Wahl said he is hopeful that the change will lead to a greater success rate for homeless people who accept offers of shelter beds from officers.McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Australia Sends Military to Help Wildfire Towns

In this Monday, Dec. 30, 2019 photo provided by State Government of Victoria, a helicopter tackles a wildfire in East Gippsland, Victoria state, Australia. Wildfires burning across Australia’s two most-populous states trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions Tuesday, Dec. 31, and were feared to have destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (State Government of Victoria via AP)

By TRISTAN LAVALETTE Associated Press

PERTH, Australia (AP) — Australia deployed military ships and aircraft Wednesday to help communities ravaged by apocalyptic wildfires that have left at least 17 people dead nationwide and sent thousands of residents and holidaymakers fleeing to the shoreline.

Navy ships and military aircraft were bringing water, food and fuel to towns where supplies were depleted and roads were cut off by the fires. Authorities confirmed three bodies were found Wednesday at Lake Conjola on the south coast of New South Wales, bringing the death toll in the state to 15.

More than 175 homes have been destroyed in the region.

Some 4,000 people in the coastal town of Mallacoota fled to the shore as winds pushed a fire toward their homes under a sky darkened by smoke and turned blood-red by flames. Stranded residents and vacationers slept in their cars, and gas stations and surf clubs transformed into evacuation areas. Dozens of homes burned before winds changed direction late Tuesday, sparing the rest of the town.

This Monday, Dec. 30, 2019 photo provided by State Government of Victoria shows wildfires in East Gippsland, Victoria state, Australia. Wildfires burning across Australia’s two most-populous states trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions Tuesday, Dec. 31, and were feared to have destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (State Government of Victoria via AP)

Victoria Emergency Commissioner Andrew Crisp told reporters the Australian Defence Force was moving naval assets to Mallacoota on a supply mission that would last two weeks and helicopters would also fly in more firefighters since roads were inaccessible.

“I think that was our biggest threat in terms of what are we doing with the children if we need to go in the water to protect ourselves given the fact that they are only 1, 3 and 5,” tourist Kai Kirschbaum told ABC Australia. “If you’re a good swimmer it doesn’t really matter if you have to be in the water for a longer time, but doing that with three kids that would have been, I think, a nightmare.”

Conditions cooled Wednesday, but the fire danger remained very high across the state, where four people are missing.

“We have three months of hot weather to come. We do have a dynamic and a dangerous fire situation across the state,” Crisp said.

In the New South Wales town of Conjola Park, 89 properties were confirmed destroyed and cars were melted by Tuesday’s fires. More than 100 fires were still burning in the state Wednesday, though none were at an emergency level. Seven people have died this week, including a volunteer firefighter, a man found in a burnt-out car and a father and son who died in their house.

Firefighting crews took advantage of easing conditions on Wednesday to restore power to critical infrastructure and conduct some back burning, before conditions were expected to deteriorate Saturday as high temperatures and strong winds return.

“There is every potential that the conditions on Saturday will be as bad or worse than we saw yesterday,” New South Wales Rural Fire Service Deputy Commissioner Rob Rogers said.

In this Monday, Dec. 30, 2019 photo provided by State Government of Victoria, a helicopter tackles a wildfire in East Gippsland, Victoria state, Australia. Wildfires burning across Australia’s two most-populous states trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions Tuesday, Dec. 31, and were feared to have destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (State Government of Victoria via AP)

The early and devastating start to Australia’s summer wildfires has led authorities to rate this season the worst on record and reignited debate about whether Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s conservative government has taken enough action on climate change. Australia is the world’s largest exporter of coal and liquefied natural gas, but Morrison rejected calls last month to downsize Australia’s lucrative coal industry.

Morrison won a surprise third term in May. Among his government’s pledges was to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 26% to 28% by 2030 — a modest figure compared to the center-left opposition Labor party’s pledge of 45%.

The leader of the minor Australian Greens party, Richard Di Natale, demanded a royal commission, the nation’s highest form of inquiry, on the wildfire crisis.

“If he (Morrison) refuses to do so, we will be moving for a parliamentary commission of inquiry with royal commission-like powers as soon as parliament returns,” Di Natale said in a statement.

This Monday, Dec. 30, 2019 photo provided by State Government of Victoria shows wildfires in East Gippsland, Victoria state, Australia. Wildfires burning across Australia’s two most-populous states trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions Tuesday, Dec. 31, and were feared to have destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (State Government of Victoria via AP)

About 5 million hectares (12.35 million acres) of land have burned nationwide over the past few months, with at least 17 people dead and more than 1,000 homes destroyed.

Some communities canceled New Year’s fireworks celebrations, but Sydney’s popular display over its iconic harbor controversially went ahead in front of more than a million revelers. The city was granted an exemption to a total fireworks ban in place there and elsewhere to prevent new wildfires.

This Monday, Dec. 30, 2019 photo provided by State Government of Victoria shows wildfires in East Gippsland, Victoria state, Australia. Wildfires burning across Australia’s two most-populous states trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions Tuesday, Dec. 31, and were feared to have destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (State Government of Victoria via AP)

Smoke from the wildfires meant Canberra, the nation’s capital, on Wednesday had air quality more than 21 times the hazardous rating to be reportedly the worst in the world.

The smoke has also wafted across the Tasman Sea and into New Zealand.

This Monday, Dec. 30, 2019 photo provided by State Government of Victoria shows wildfires in East Gippsland, Victoria state, Australia. Wildfires burning across Australia’s two most-populous states trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions Tuesday, Dec. 31, and were feared to have destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (State Government of Victoria via AP)

All contents © copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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NY State Police testing new vertical light bars on vehicles

From PoliceOne

NEW YORK — The New York State Police has modified the light bars on top of their police cruisers to make emergency vehicles more noticeable.

WHEC reports the new light bars sit both horizontally and vertically atop police vehicles. The goal is to make vehicles more noticeable, especially from the side of the road, so drivers have more time to move over.

New light bars installed on New York State Police vehicles are designed to increase visibility. (Photo/NYSP)
New light bars installed on New York State Police vehicles are designed to increase visibility. (Photo/NYSP)

“It’s incredibly dangerous on the side of the roadway and most of the people don’t have any idea because they’ve never been on the side of the road and if they have it’s only been for moments,” Trooper Mark O’Donnell told WHEC. “But the police officers, the firefighters, the EMS people…their 8 to 12-hour shift is in the roadway or on the side of the road, so give us a break.”

NYSP plans to test the new lights to see if they impact driver behavior and emergency vehicle safety, WHEC reports.

O’Donnell couldn’t say how long NYSP is planning to test the impact of the new light bars or how much they’ll cost.

Massachusetts police start new program to build community relationships, locate suspects

From Jeanette DeForge at MassLive.com

CHICOPEE, Mass. — For 22 years, police Sgt. Thomas Gazda has been responding to call after call, mainly arresting or warning suspects before heading to the next problem.

But starting in January that’s going to change. Gazda has been selected as the leader of a three-person team that will take a new approach to crime-fighting by working with business owners, community leaders, social services agencies and the troublemakers themselves.

A three-person 'C3' team was created to address crime and build community relationships in downtown Chicopee, Mass. The program follows similar models used by the military. (Photo/TNS)
A three-person ‘C3’ team was created to address crime and build community relationships in downtown Chicopee, Mass. The program follows similar models used by the military. (Photo/TNS)

The Police Department is instituting a “C3” policing unit in Chicopee Center. The name stands for Counter Criminal Continuum, and the program follows practices used by the military in war zones, having officers form friendships with law-abiding people in the neighborhoods and using those relationships to identify criminals and connect people who need help with services.

“We know what we are doing is not working in the center. We want to bring in a new strategy,” Police Chief William R. Jebb said.

In the past year or so, there have been a number of problems downtown including a homicide, several shootings and assaults, and a brawl involving at least 300 teens.

“We have seen a spike in crime in recent years and there have been a lot more problems with nuisance crimes … vagrancy, car breaks, small disturbances,” Jebb said. “We want to attack it now. We want to be proactive.”

As part of that effort, the Police Department is renting a former bank office at 35 Center St. for a substation that will be staffed by the C3 officers, with the assistance of volunteers, and open to residents. The department had a downtown office in the Chamber of Commerce building, but it was difficult to find. Now the building is being repurposed and the police are being evicted, Jebb said.

The new office is easily accessible and will be very visible. Residents will be encouraged to drop in to talk to the officers. There are conference rooms for community meetings and other gatherings.

The key to the program is to have officers work with business owners and community leaders, such as members of the Chicopee Center Neighborhood Association. The effort is wide-reaching and will involve anyone who wants to get involved, and the C3 officers will hold regular meetings, Jebb said.

Jebb said he remembers Chicopee Center was always busy when he was growing up. Now major development is being planned for the downtown with the conversion of the Cabotville and Lyman mills into apartments. But people must feel downtown is safe to attract new investments in the city, he said.

In addition to the C3 effort, police will have a downtown walking beat around the clock and regular patrols with cruisers. The difference is while officers rotate in and out for the walking beats, the same C3 officers — Gazda, Keith Hevey and John Slachetka — will be a constant presence downtown so they can build relationships with the community, Jebb said. The three officers will work flexible shifts so they can attend evening meetings, weekend activities or other events, he said.

The program takes extra resources, but this month a regional dispatch center with civilian dispatchers opened in Chicopee, freeing up six officers daily from previous duties of handling calls and enabling the city to try C3 policing, Jebb said.

The C3 team will be in close communication with school resource officers, who will share information about youth gangs and other issues likely to spill into the neighborhoods, as one violent gang of youths did about four years ago.

They also will work with the building and health departments to crack down on code enforcement issues. “We want to attack quality-of-life issues,” Jebb said.

Jebb used an example of Lucy Wisniowski Park, which had become such a gathering spot for gangs and drug activity that families avoided it, even though most children in the nieghborhood had no other place to play. In a case like that, the C3 officers might organize basketball games or simply spend time in the park to make children feel safe and show the gangs they’re unwelcome, he said.

One of the goals is to not just arrest people, but also to help them get into a better situation.

“When you are dealing with gangs and posses some people need to be locked up, but others can get out if they are offered an opportunity to get a GED or a job,” said state Trooper Michael Cutone, who developed the C3 program based on military methods he witnessed while serving overseas with the U.S. Army. He is training the Chicopee C3 officers.

Gazda was selected as the leader of the team because he is highly motivated, community-oriented and has the personality and experience for the position, Jebb said. The chief asked other interested officers to apply and nine responded. Applicants put together PowerPoint presentations and were interviewed. Hevey, an officer for 3\u00bd years, and Slachetka, a 7-year officer, were selected. Jebb said he hopes to eventually expand to a five-person C3 team.

The three C3 officers agreed that, under the old system, they didn’t have time to talk with people and find out more about their circumstances or follow up on problems they learned about on calls.

A suspect may be shoplifting because he is living in a tent on the riverbank and doesn’t know about the city’s soup kitchen, Gazda said. An addict may want to stop using heroin but not know where to turn.

“We have a homeless population downtown and we get a lot of calls about them trespassing, shoplifting,” Gazda said. “Maybe we can help them.”

Jebb said he consulted with Springfield Police Commissioner Cheryl C. Clapprood, who has been involved in C3 policing since her department started using the model about 10 years ago.

“What we have seen is a drop in crime in the areas that we put it in,” Clapprood said. The city now has C3 units in four neighborhoods, the South End, the North End, Hill-McKnight and Forest Park, which were selected due to income levels, home ownership, education levels of residents and crime problems. About 45 officers work in the C3 units.

The key is to work with community partners, Clapprood said. Springfield’s C3 units have a close relationship with Baystate Health, which now has a trained medical professional who often responds with police to calls for people who are suicidal or in crisis, she said.

“I think the most important piece of advice I have is to encompass and embrace the social service partners,” Clapprood said. “They have to be there for you to address alcohol and addiction and truancy.”

Baystate will also have an office in the Chicopee Center police substation to assist those who have an addiction or are mentally ill, Jebb said.

The C3 units in Springfield also work closely with Quebec Team officers, who work in the schools. “That is a big factor if you can reach kids at risk who are likely to join gangs,” Clapprood said. Sometimes one mentor — a coach, a teacher, an officer — can make a big difference in ensuring a child becomes a good citizen, she said.

“You can’t do it for everyone, it isn’t a panacea,” she said. “For some of these kids it is day-to-day, they are used to surviving. But if you can make them understand they can be what they want to be, it helps.”

Wildfire Damages Homes in Chile

From WildLandFireFighter

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The federal government in Chile declared an alert Tuesday over a wildfire that had damaged dozens of homes on the outskirts of the port city of Valparaiso.

Photo by Hemerson Coelho on Pexels.com

News video showed large tongues of flames along the hills overlooking the city. People walked through smoke carrying bags and even pets.

The National Forestry Commission of the Agriculture Ministry said on Twitter that at least 100 hectares (250 acres) were burned by afternoon and people had been evacuated from the area.

Firefighters from Valparaiso and Viña del Mar were being aided by helicopters and airplanes in battling the blaze.

Agriculture Minister Antonio Walker said late in the day that at least 120 homes had been affected by the fire.

All contents © copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Product Post: ECCO Vantage LED Exterior Lightbar

The ECCO Vantage LED Exterior Lightbar is designed to offer excellent value in terms of cost, performance, durability, flexibility of configuration and of course, easy installation and use. Suitable for a wide variety of applications where width of vehicle warning is required, the Vantage lightbar is available in 8 configurations to suit most needs. Call us for custom configurations.

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  • 12-20005-E: 54″ – 16 LED Warning Modules, Add Alleys, Worklights and STT
  • 12-20003-E: 60″ – 16 LED Warning Modules
  • 12-20006-E: 60″ – 16 LED Warning Modules, Add Alleys, Worklights and STT

Features

  • 48 flash patterns.
  • Five color options: Amber, Blue, Clear, Green and Red.
  • 16 Wide-angle Warning LED modules.
  • Three length options: 48”, 54” and 60”.
  • Aluminum chassis, polycarbonate base and lens.
  • All lenses and domes are clear.
  • Optional 5 Function Controller (See in side-bar).
  • Range of strap mounting accessory kits (See in side-bar).
  • Optional LED Modules: Worklights, Alley Lights and Stop-Tail-Turn.
  • Customizable configuration available (Call for custom configurations).

Specifications

  • Voltage: 12-24 VDC
  • Current: 7.2 Amps
  • Flash Patterns: 48
  • Height: 2.5”
  • Width: 11”
  • Temperature Range: -22F to +122F (-30°C to +50°C)
  • Approval: SAE J845 Class I, California Title 13, CE, R10

ECCO 3 Years Warranty